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InnoCentive Challenges: Chemistry

Thursday, 10 December 2009

Materials Science and Engineering Defined: Science, Technology, and Society and much more @ MIT OPEN COURSES-Free online

Materials Science and Engineering Defined: Science, Technology, and Society and much more @ MIT OPEN COURSES-Free online

Boost career prospects by widening your horizons with this link for students and professional life-long learning

Tuesday, 1 December 2009

Biomodels to Biomimicry?

My title question is a stab in the dark and shows more about my material chemistry focus and my ignorance of serious biological background.

However I like to keep my eye on modelling activities, as an educational aid, otherwise biological process modelling is a thing I try to stay away from, highly specialised technical language and concepts.

That being said this data dase is certainly worth bookmarking for either of the above categories for current or future use and hopefully may generate a few tips from the pros on how to make a few more steps in biomimicry?

in reference to: BioModels Database (view on Google Sidewiki)

Chemical Compatibility - Data Base by Cole-Parmer

Direct link in support of the previous entry. Take a few minites to review the data, conversion factors,refs. Regulatory Bodies, and Tech Tools.

Play it safely in chemistry.

in reference to:

"Chemical Compatibility"
- Cole-Parmer: Chemical Resistance Database (view on Google Sidewiki)

Chemical Compatibility

This link is a useful reminder to anticipate potential hazard in practice. (Of course the specialist professional chemist will prefer the EU programme REACH for his R&D.

Acknowlegement
Cole-Parmer via M. Mayor on Twitter.

in reference to:

"Chemical Compatibility"
- Oh sh*t, it’s on fire. Using a chemical compatibility database can save your job, and your life. « Cole-Parmer Blog (view on Google Sidewiki)

Thursday, 26 November 2009

The teraton challenge. A review of fixation and transformation of carbon dioxide, Danish work brought to us by RCS-The Royal Chemical Soc.,UK.

A few months ago a Prof. of Chemistry friend at a major Univ. in France expressed scepticism concerning the CCS - carbon capture and sequestration, the geological and geoengineering response to increases in CO2 a well documented GWG-global warming gas. (Increases roughly since James Watts invention of the steam engine Cf. David JC Mackay's book "Without Hot Air" "David JC Mackay's book "Without Hot Air") my chemist friend's objection concerned dangers of stored carbon escape since CO2 is not in a chemically combined and imprisoned form. Of course the physicists, and geological engineers consider that suitably stable, deep sites may be found whereby high pressures in deep wells is sufficient to maintain the CO2 in the liquid, or pseudo liquid (super-saturated) state to remain simple. More audacious consider that by avoiding sequestration in valleys especially inhabited valley even if there is gas escape there will be no serious consequences.

Whatever, I am extremely pleased to find this Danish work via my blog listed RSS feed whereby CO2 mitigation is suggested by physical-chemistry methods which should come closer to meeting the approval of my chemistry friend.

The Danish consider what they feel are six important CO2 transformations namely:
1. chemical transformations,
2. photochemical reductions,
3. chemical and electrochemical reductions,
4. biological conversions,
5. reforming and inorganic transformations.



In addition, the vast research area of carbon capture and storage is reviewed briefly.

Such reviews should help suggest and channel themes of research and thus improve the overall mastering of our incredible capacity to generate CO2 in energy production,industry and transportation.

REFERENCE TO FULL PAPER FREELY AVAILABLE.

en référence à : Energy & Environmental Science Articles (afficher sur Google Sidewiki)

The electronic properties of graphene and carbon nanotubes from Nature asia pacific

A brief review is given on the characteristic features of electronic states and transport in graphene consisting of a single sheet of graphite, and its cylinder form called a carbon nanotube by Tsuneya Ando a renowned Japanse expert in these fields.

This is a timely and highly readable review as one would expect from Nature and Associates.

This full review and more about the author as well as many other papers and reviews may be found in the new NPG Asia Mater Journal on simple registration.
ref.
NPG Asia Mater. 1(1) 17–21 (2009) | doi:10.1038/asiamat.2009.1
Published online 21 October 2009

en référence à :

"NPG Asia Mater. 1(1) 17–21 (2009) | doi:10.1038/asiamat.2009.1 Published online 21 October 2009"
- The electronic properties of graphene and carbon nanotubes: Reviews : NPG Asia Materials (afficher sur Google Sidewiki)

Tuesday, 20 October 2009

Packaging Materials Selector aids decision-making and change, just the infamous Plastic bag syndrome or a serious step in the proper direction?

I was awakened to the subject as a whole not just the plastic bag rubbish, which incidentally allowed me to freely recycle garbade to the incinerator, I trust rather than to landfil.(I was told the landfills are rolled hence there is no biodegradability worth the name. Now I pay for a similar product or use one which has no recycleability control


I was awakened to the subject as a whole not just the plastic bag rubbish, which incidentally allowed me to freely recycle garbage to the incinerator, I trust rather than to landfill.(I was told the landfills are rolled hence there is no biodegradability worth the name. Now I pay for a similar product or use one which has no recycleability control

I'll just have to wait until the specialist members of The Institute of Materials Minerals and Mining, Clay, Packaging and now Wood provide some Co data. Hopefully members know of this site or of the well known Granta Eco-selector’s efforts.

Join me in reading IOM3's Packaging Materials Journal

in reference to: Sustainable Packaging Alliance : News (view on Google Sidewiki)

Monday, 19 October 2009

Looking for a field to research, choose the people to follw: Royal Society 2010 Anniversary Professorships

N°1 for materials science and engineering or materials chemistry could be Andre Geim FRS, FinstP who is Langworthy Professor of Physics at the University of Manchester and is known primarily for the discovery of graphene. Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms densely packed into a honeycomb lattice and the first representative of one atom thick materials which until 2004 had remained unknown. Graphene has many potential uses ranging from ultrafast transistors to bendable gadgets and from composite materials to novel batteries, and has been tipped as a likely successor to silicon in electronics. Geim is also known for his educational experiments on magnetic levitation (the "flying frog" experiment) and the development of a biomimetic adhesive known as "gecko tape".

2. The current hotest of topics is undoubtedly Climate Change. The professorship goes to Professor Andrew Watson FRS, University of East Anglia. He aims to improve our understanding of carbon sinks' and develop a model for the global accounting of the atmospheric CO2 budget. I intend to put more RS top quality studies on climate chage etc. in further wikis and on my blogs.

en référence à :

"Professor Andrew Watson FRS, University of East Anglia. He aims to improve our understanding of carbon sinks' and develop a model for the global accounting of the atmospheric CO2 budget."
- Top researchers receive Royal Society 2010 Anniversary Professorships (afficher sur Google Sidewiki)

Friday, 16 October 2009

Materials Views: Materials Chemistry, Materials Physics, Materials Science Nano-science and technology

There is much to be leaned in all the fields underlined in the above post title.

The scope is wide and demandingly specialised in terms of the science, technologies and engineering involved, all brought together by Wiley Intercience in their very attractive publication, Materials Views. Moreover their currebt early views are freely available online to peruse or download accordingly.

Most papers deal with the nanoscale. I noted especially papers:
a) using the concepts of materials testing and strength,
b) energy vectors and storage, batteries, hydrogen storage..
c)electronic materials
d) biomimetics and softmaterials, polymers..

Run an eye over the list of papers and abstracts and make your own choices,
join me in reading your favourite subjects. And why not give your view your materials view?

Sincerely,
JA

en référence à : Wiley InterScience :: JOURNALS :: Advanced Materials (afficher sur Google Sidewiki)

Monday, 12 October 2009

Bioactive Glasses_J of Biomaterials Appications Sage Publications free until 31Oct09

A very rapid glance at the compositions of bioactive glases in this paper, may intregue process metallurgists and steelmakers all familiar with nature and composition of their favourite chemical reactant, slags. Could there be possibly routes to improving value in recycling this abondant by-product?

Feel free (till 31 Oct09) to read the journal.

Please do not hesitate to send all your feedback.

Introduction to Bioactive Gass
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bioactive_glass

Ref. J. of Bioactive Materials.

in reference to: Surface Modification of Bioactive Glasses and Preparation of PDLLA/Bioactive Glass Composite Films -- Gao and Chang 24 (2): 119 -- Journal of Biomaterials Applications (view on Google Sidewiki)

Tuesday, 29 September 2009

Cases where Molecular Dynamics in Submicron Structures Held in Question by Quantum Mechanics Quantum mechanics negates Molecular Dynamics analysis

Quantum mechanics negates Molecular Dynamics analysis that assumes atoms in submicron structures have the same thermal heat capacity as in the Bulk.

Noted for future ref;

Sources
1. ScienceBlog

2. PRLog,free press release

Thursday, 23 April 2009

Material Matters™ and Materials Matter™?_Part II_ Acknowledgement and Dedication to the late Prof. John Edwin Harris (Jack)

Dedication to a friend and mentor.

Jack Harris, the regular Materials World columnist, presents his views on topical issues under the heading Materials Matter. The journal has recently announced, "the sad news that Jack Harris, Fellow of the Institute (FIMM) died in February 2009. There will therefore be no Materials Matters columns for the time being. A full obituary for Jack will appear in due course in Materials World. "

Jack, Prof. John Edwin Harris, MBE, FRS, FREng, FIMMM to give him his full title, was a true friend, in that he gave me much needed encouragement to pursue my contribution to my profession as a metallurgist, materials scientist and engineer. He encouraged me, and certainly many others to write. His column and contact led me to write again in english, after many years in France. I was honored that he found time to exchange correspondence, giving a reference or again an opinion, often simply adding an (s) to make a word plural "for growth-inclusiveness versus exclusion" At the time he was Editor in chief of Interdisciplinary Science Reviews an Institute of Materials Minerals and Mining Journal. This was a timely reminder of the interdisciplinary nature of our subject it's art and practice. He introduced me to some of his friends, shining examples and role model to follow. This encouraged me to write regularly, not only my web pages but several full papers, and book reviews the latter on behalf of the Institute. His column, Materials Matter, in Materials World was the first page I turned to, upon receiving my members journal in the post each month.

-My last exchange with Jack was via the open comment through his column "Comparing nuclear power in France and England" and more specifically picking up his pointer on renewable energy Bureaucracy spawns chaotic energy policy', by Sir William Lithgow, The Times, 8 October 2008.
- Jack's last column corresponded with the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin 150th anniversary of the publication of his epoch-making book, On the Origin of Species, published after his death.

For me Materials Matter™, in spite of Jack's passing away, will in my mind remain his trade mark, ™, a difficult act and to follow.

Jack's lead continues after his death. He once advised me in a quiet way that a good place to start an enquiry was via the Royal Society and her members. While writing this and thanks to the Internet, I paid a new visit to both Royal Societies of which Jack was a member, The Royal Academy of Engineering, FREng, and The Royal Society FR. My current interest being in media assisted learning, I was more than well recompensed both The Academy and The Royal Society propose rich media materials, Web TV, lectures and conferences which I viewed with Realplayer
The Royal Academy of Engineering Media Website TV and Video.
The Royal Society Media Website TV and Video.

Let me end with this quote from Lord Rees, (FRS) current president of the Royal Society, who described John Edwin Harris (Jack) as "a fine example of the 'activist' and socially concerned scientist. We need more like him."

A fuller tribute has been given by his friend Dr. Frank Duckworth and published in the Guardian.

PS. I hope you and more especially your family, your friends, colleagues and peers approve of my personal tribute and attempt to keep his memory and guidance alive for the benefit of younger generations, generations of scientists, engineers and writers. Jack was perhaps a gifted Alchemist.

Material Matters and Materials Matter™?_Part I_ Acknowledgements and Dedication

This is really a double appreciation and a dedication to a lost friend.

The first acknowledgment is to the Materials Chemists whom I feel I have been neglecting of late, although some overlap occurs with my Materials Science and Engineering "defined" site.

In this case I am referring, the reader to the commercial materials chemistry company Sigma-Aldrich and their Learning Centre freely available reviews Material Matters ™ (12 quarterly reviews from 2006 to date,subjects covered: Alternative Energy Materials,Biomaterials, Metal & Ceramic Science, Micro & Nanoelectronics, Nanomaterials, Nanotechnology,Organic Electronics, Polymer Science) and Tutorials.

Dedication to a friend and mentor.
Jack Harris, the regular Materials World columnist, presents his views on topical issues under the heading Materials Matter. The journal has recently announce quote: "the sad news that Jack Harris, Fellow of the Institute (FIMM) died in February 2009. There will therefore be no Materials Matters columns for the time being. A full obituary for Jack will appear in due course in Materials World. "

Monday, 19 January 2009

More EU RSS Feed-Flux - 17 First Class Choices

Some items will appear in more than one feed because they relate to, for example, both Health & Life Sciences and the Information Society. The categories used are the same ones you will find in the Information Centre menus.

Full list as follows:
Astronomy
Communicable diseases
Energy
Environment
FP7
Health & life sciences
Information society
International cooperation
Materials & products
Pure sciences
Research policy
Science & society
SMEs
Social sciences and humanities
Sustainable development
Teledetection
Transport

Saturday, 10 January 2009

Introducing Snap Shots from Snap.com - New Widget Enhanced Functionality

Introducing Snap Shots from Snap.com


I just installed a nice little tool on this site called Snap Shots that enhances links with visual previews of the destination site, interactive excerpts of Wikipedia articles, MySpace profiles, IMDb profiles and Amazon products, display in-line videos, RSS, MP3s, photos, stock charts and more.

Sometimes Snap Shots bring you the information you need, without your having to leave the site, while other times it lets you "look ahead," before deciding if you want to follow a link or not.

Please feel free to comment on this widget.

Should you decide this is not for you, just click the Options icon in the upper right corner of the Snap Shot and opt-out.

Saturday, 3 January 2009

NEW RSS CHEM. BLOGS and WEBSITE FEEDS APPROACH - SCROLL DOWN

As a new year feature for 2009, I trust readers fellow bloggers and webmasters will appreciate my use of RSS feed.

Please do not hesitate to let me know how useful this approach is.

All sites are worth special mention some famous such as Chemistry World some less so bravely maintained by individual chemist.

Good luck and good chemisty for the common good.

NB. Check that you and your lab has a carbon foot-print bottom-up approach, for progress begins with science!